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Discussion Starter #1
Okay, here is for a fun Thursday:

How do you ride your bike?
1) Do you sit back, arms almost straight? Or, do you lean forward, elbows bent, as in a sport bike?
2) When turning, do you lean the bike first? Or, do you shift your butt off the seat first?

Here is me:
1) Lately I have been leaning forward more, I feel it makes for smother shifting when catching speed and when entering corners.
2) I have changed the way I turn slightly lately, I slide my butt off the seat on the side I am turning to, I think this is due to so much gravel and dirt on the roads that I try to keep the bike as straight as possible while still turning with some good speed.

I noticed the way I ride has changed, so I wanted to see what others' have to say on the topic, share away you all, and have a great day! :thumbup
 

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Counter steer FTW always. Treat your handle bars like they are made of egg shell and RELAX, arms bent and grip the tank with your thighs. Getting half of your butt off the seat early is always a good thing and the more upright you have the bike through the corner without compromising the turn in and apex is ideal.

Yes I have recently been on some mad training :)
 

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+1 to everything KMD said


1. Depends on how I'm riding. Putting around, upright and relaxed. Corner carving, sportier position with my butt off the seat half the time.

2. ALWAYS do your butt scooting before the turn. Trying to shift your weight around while already turning causes instability. Watch the pros, they are in position before they enter the turns. Trying to shift position when already leaned over feels sketchy as hell to me. Use your legs more than your arms and try to keep your weight on the pegs instead of the seat. A good day of hard riding if done right should leave you with sore legs, not arms.


Coming from an offroad background, I really can't imagine riding any bike without moving my weight around. I worry about the guys on street bikes trying to ride fast through curves without ever moving their upper body, much less their lower body. It just looks like they aren't having any fun and they are always that much closer to a crash since the bike is leaned over far more than it needs to be. I like to know I have extra lean angle left just in case I run wide or need to make some other line adjustment.
 

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I don't move around on the bike at all any more, but I think that's down to riding a R1200GS.

I used to do the hang off before a turn when I had the CB1000R and sports bikes, and I found dropping the shoulder helped too.

A few years back I attended the Ron Haslam school for some track tuition. And the amount of shifting you do to ride Donington Park was amazing. My legs ached for three days after.
 

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A few years back I attended the Ron Haslam school for some track tuition. And the amount of shifting you do to ride Donington Park was amazing. My legs ached for three days after.

Would love to do that - just got one of the old race school dvds that mcn were hawking ...fancy a guided blast on a CBR6ooRR !!!
 

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ok this is a subject i like :). i'd say whether it's street or track riding, it's all about reducing lean angle to keep as much tire on the ground as possible at a given speed. all within limits of course as one can hang off and keep the bike upright to a point where the physics don't work in the way getting off the bike should. so...

some people say only get your body to the inside of the bike (ie "hanging off") when you're track riding; i say, right is right. and for me; if i'm riding in the canyons or other technical roads, i use what i've learned at the track or parking lot to help me go faster/safer, again within limits. do i have knee pucks on my street pants? yes, but only to remind me that if they are touching, that's as far as i want to go over.

2 photos of me on the CB, one from street (mulholland) and one from track. both in a corner. body position very similar. cruising around town.. pretty much on the bike using bar pressure to turn. in the twisties with pace, i try to use body position and body mass to help with lean angle.

as for body position, what i've been taught... it's not just butt off the seat, it's torso to the inside, weighting the inside peg, putting some pressure from the outside leg on the tank to tighten a line when necessary, relaxing the inside arm and elbow, some bar pressure to initiate a turn but keeping my hands relaxed, and making sure i'm not "crossed up" by leading with my forehead to some degree (ie, keeping my head to the outside of the bike as well.

D4S_0250-(ZF-5823-22228-1-001).jpg 4TR_5316.jpg
 

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On the cb i tend to sit as far forwards as possible grip the tank with thighs getting at much weight over the front as possible. I tend to be more motocross stlye this time of year pushing the bike down away from me lean angles are a minimum in the cold wet conditions. In summer as picture above.
If not in full attack mode i tend to be lazy and just sit on the seat and move my torso. IMO there is no right or wrong way. Just whatever feels comfortable.
 

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I been riding for nearly a year and a half, and recently I've noticed that I feel more comfortable in turns if I stick the knee out to the side that the bike is turning... Is it wrong? So from what you guys are saying we should lean the body and not the bike?
 

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I don't hold with leaning off the bike on the street unless visibility allows it. I want to be able to see as far ahead as possible and be as visible as possible, neither of which is conducive to hanging off.

I did the Ron Haslam school in 1998, about 3 months after I killed my CBR1000 with a telegraph pole. I could still hardly walk, but I had a hell of a time ;-)
 

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A telegraph pole?? Holy cow! You are old!!
 

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I been riding for nearly a year and a half, and recently I've noticed that I feel more comfortable in turns if I stick the knee out to the side that the bike is turning... Is it wrong? So from what you guys are saying we should lean the body and not the bike?

Nothing is technically wrong with sticking your knee/arm/ or whatever you feel you must stick out during a turn.
The theory behind it, is that you can put more weight into the inside of the turn while keeping the bike more upright and on the fatter part of the tyre, which gives more grip.

I cannot recommend getting some advanced on road training enough. Being a rider of just 18 months, you would benefit immensely.

Good luck.
 

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I find when going for it on bumpy back roads (bucking bronco) the best position is arse pushed against the pillion hump, tank gripped with knees and handlebars very loosely held. Any wheelies are relaxed, wobbles are kept to a minimum, no tank slapping and the thing tracks straight. If you are tense then the bike will sense it and the confidence will soon suffer.
Have to agree with leaning off in a sensible way regarding fat part of tyre keeping contact. Last weekend I exaggerated the bum cheek position on the seat to maintain the tyre contact due to the conditions and it certainly helped. No slides for me even under hard acceleration on slippy back roads.
 

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...... and yes as Gargy said some training with such a short track (road) record would safe guard you. There are a lot of subtleties that you may not be aware of, things that old hands have picked up over years, sometimes the hard way. I have been off at least five times (not on the CB and not including off road) and each one has taught me something!

Not trying to patronise you here as I don't know you but there is so much hidden detail that could save you and 18 months experience is inadequate if you were to go looning :thumbup
 

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I understand what you're saying... I would love to go on training but unfortunately in Madeira there is no such thing... In Lisbon (Estoril) there are some track days and driving courses by BMW but you have to take your own bike. I would have to sent mine by boat and it would take several days... An alternative would be to rent a bike (not sure if they would rent it for a track day/course) but from what I've seen you have to leave a deposit of 1500€ and in logistic it would be a nightmare because of the gear.

I usually don't go looning, just a bit on the straights!
 

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what he said :). getting taught by the pros changed everything i do on the bike and completely changed the way i think about riding as well. no way i ride the way i do now without investing my time and money into coaching. but that's sort of the point; most things we try to teach ourselves without any professional help don't lead us to being nearly as proficient in whatever it is we want to learn as we would be without professional help.

i've taken a few schools that have really helped, here's an example of one i took and why i did it. posted this last year when it came out but in case you missed it..

https://youtu.be/kYpo11zr1mQ?list=FL_fQ73xEIHWxL_IjYzKPExw

Nothing is technically wrong with sticking your knee/arm/ or whatever you feel you must stick out during a turn.
The theory behind it, is that you can put more weight into the inside of the turn while keeping the bike more upright and on the fatter part of the tyre, which gives more grip.

I cannot recommend getting some advanced on road training enough. Being a rider of just 18 months, you would benefit immensely.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Lots of great tips and advice from the wise men here. I also am an old school guy, or just plain old, but the point is that like most older guys, I started riding motorcycles around 25 years ago. Back then the technology available on the bikes was very different, the suspension, the brakes, the geometry and weight distribution, all of this made us ride in a very different way.
In a way I feel lucky, learning to ride on a bike where I had to do all the work taught me a lot about motorcycle dynamics. Ahhh, I miss the old good times, but I also enjoy riding my high-tech CB1R. :thumbup
 

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You young whipper-snapper! In my day bikes had an invisible hinge in the middle. Try hitting a bump in the middle of a 100mph sweeper on a CX500 ... puts hairs on yer chest does that.
 

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you must be an old timer if you think the CB1000 is a "high tech" bike. these days it's stripped down compared to all the other naked performance bikes with ABS, TC, wheelie control, electronic suspension, etc

Lots of great tips and advice from the wise men here. I also am an old school guy, or just plain old, but the point is that like most older guys, I started riding motorcycles around 25 years ago. Back then the technology available on the bikes was very different, the suspension, the brakes, the geometry and weight distribution, all of this made us ride in a very different way.
In a way I feel lucky, learning to ride on a bike where I had to do all the work taught me a lot about motorcycle dynamics. Ahhh, I miss the old good times, but I also enjoy riding my high-tech CB1R. :thumbup
 

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You young whipper-snapper! In my day bikes had an invisible hinge in the middle. Try hitting a bump in the middle of a 100mph sweeper on a CX500 ... puts hairs on yer chest does that.
You're a young Whippersnapper.----In my day EVERYTHING hinged !!!!! There wasn't a firm bit on the bike. Those two squishy saddle springs didn't help very much either.

Having to take a hand off the bars to operate the oil pump mounted on the tank was quite distracting too. If you didn't give it a pump now and then the big ends would seize up.

You learned great balance though with one hand pumping oil and the other operating the tank mounted gear change lever. That was what taught you to grip the tank with your legs. !! Lol.

You mention 100 mph. That was FAST. In my day we just had to try and not run over the man with the Red flag.

62 years now, for me riding bikes.--;) Not too much damage. A broken thumb 55 years ago and two cracked ribs about 6 years ago. ) ( Ice, the first. Gravel the second. )

The riding position for the CB 1000 suits me very well with my weight of 65 kg and a height of 5 foot 11. ( Sorry about the mixed up measurements. Lol )

I bought the CB 5 years ago as my Hornet was just not quick enough for me. The CB meets the bill OK.

Don't move off the saddle much on cornering but I always lean my upper body into a bend as that, I find, really helps the bike to turn quicker.



Colvert.---:respekt




PS. HAIRS on your chest ?????????? So that's what made them start sprouting is it ?? ( Live and learn. Lol. )
 
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