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2019 CB1000R
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So, are you saying you just jam the gear in without touching the clutch when you are above 2nd gear?
It's clutchless upshifting. You become the QS. In this case, when you want to upshift you reduce engine output by quickly rolling off the throttle a bit and lifting the shift lever. It's a common practice among experienced riders.

With a QS you keep the throttle fixed and the QS briefly kills engine output so you can upshift without the clutch.

 

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2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
It's clutchless upshifting. You become the QS. In this case, when you want to upshift you reduce engine output by quickly rolling off the throttle a bit and lifting the shift lever. It's a common practice among experienced riders.

With a QS you keep the throttle fixed and the QS briefly kills engine output so you can upshift without the clutch.
Yes, I heard of this but have always wondered about the wear+tear on the gears with using clutch vs clutch-less (manual or QS).
 

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Yes, I heard of this but have always wondered about the wear+tear on the gears with using clutch vs clutch-less (manual or QS).
The video explains there's no harm to the transmission when done correctly. It's smooth as butter when done correctly. Been doing it a lot of years on a lot of bikes. It's common among the "kids" I ride with.

When you use the QS the clutch does not disengage.
 

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2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
The video explains there's no harm to the transmission when done correctly. It's smooth as butter when done correctly. Been doing it a lot of years on a lot of bikes. It's common among the "kids" I ride with.

When you use the QS the clutch does not disengage.
Did you slap in the link to the video? Never mind, you inserted it above.
Thnx.
 
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2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
Informative video!

One side point he made in the vid (besides the main point) was the ability to ride home when you broke the clutch lever completely or your clutch cable snapped, using clutch-less shifts.
Hmmm ... how do you do that if you cannot get past the 1st gear without friction zone?
 

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...try not to stop until you get home.
BTDT
not on this CB1000R.

But tried it just to make sure.

On a bike with a slipper clutch one can briefly stop with a gear engaged.
And use the QS only.
'Tis one reason why slipper clutch gets the name.

CB1000R MY21 QS isn't the very best in production.
It works, but needs TLC persuasion.
AKA brute force.

The supposedly slipper clutch doesn't.

So with a CB1000R and a broken clutch cable
you're in the proverbial creek without a paddle.

If you can keep the rev's
with your left hand maybe,
it's possible to feather the clutch pushing the little stubby clutch arm
on the right cover.

Doesn't deactivate the QS because the clutch switch stays on.

Yes ... tried THAT too.
 

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Informative video!

One side point he made in the vid (besides the main point) was the ability to ride home when you broke the clutch lever completely or your clutch cable snapped, using clutch-less shifts.
Hmmm ... how do you do that if you cannot get past the 1st gear without friction zone?
If you can start the bike in gear (not the

case for modern bikes) then just stop and stall in 1st or 2nd and press the starter or push start to go.

Otherwise, snag neutral before or after stopping and push start. Use 3rd.

Clutches gear shifting is easy up and down on modern bikes (with practice). The CB changes clutchlessly very smoothly with the right touch.
 

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2013 CB100R White
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but back to the (earlier) thread-jack: here are the speed limits in the USA by state:


I've ridden I-15 in southern Utah, posted 80 mph. most traffic seemed to travel at about 85.

I've ridden I-10 between LA and Phoenix, posted 75. most traffic seemed to travel at about 85. altho I had a fairly long 'play session' with a Panamerica at about 140.... the bike gets a pretty good weave on at that speed, with luggage...

I've ridden US 50 ("the loneliest road in America") across Nevada, twice . I don't recall there being a posted limit. I drifted along comfortably at about 85. except for that time the blue Vette came up behind me, fast... so he went by, and I wicked it up... to about 130, for the 20 minutes... together... then I gave him a wave and stopped for gas, while he continued!

I've ridden several interstates in Montana, and there is no daytime limit. most traffic seems to travel at 85 - 90.

but the fastest road I've ever ridden was I-75, north from Chattanooga to Knoxville. I recall the posted limit as 75, and I seldom ride faster than 85 mph ( 140kph ). at that speed, the majority of the traffic was flowing past me at a fair clip. I'd estimate one car in 10 was doing 100 mph! freakin' hell, man! OK if you know the road, and if you're in a cage; but scary on a bike! if anything goes wrong, you're dead, full stop!
 

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Ah well there you go. I knew I'd driven on an 85 stretch driving from Gulfport, Mississippi to San Jose, California on i10 ... but it must have been part of Texas, not New Mexico.

On that 85 stretch, the standard pace appeared to be 100. Here in the San Francisco bay area, 65 is the normal limit, but much of the time even 75 is 'slow' compared to the majority. And many bikers will lane-split at 80++. So I've heard cough.
 

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2019 CB1000R
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Cloud Sky Nature Road surface Asphalt

TX-130 Between Austin and Lockhart. On this road I found out the cruise control on my Q60 RedSport 400 has a max limit of 85 mph so I had to push the pedal myself.
 

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thread-jack:... and back

The idea of blasting WFO throttle on a straight empty road is much much fun
Best fun one can have with her clothes on.

Don't try this on no scenic Autobahn with a CB1000R.
The CB is heaviest and has the lowest HP of ALL the litre roadsters!

Slow riders and slow bikes are allowed.
But on a CB1000R, better avoid this left lane.

Some of the best motorcycle roads are in the mountains.

Trouble is the plods enjoy to man very efficient well hidden speed traps.
The fine could dent the little jaunt.
They can even keep your bike, they'll auction it to pay the fine!

Car Vehicle Sky Motor vehicle Automotive mirror


You're a cunning motorcyclist, you can sniff out a laser or a radar.
-Got a duty-free detector-

Only on those roads you can ride a CB1000R.
On the super slab you're just a retard clown, a commuter.

BUT
don't pass that Merc AMG.
See the little old lady driving the 4Matic Panzer.
She'll pick up her mobile phone, speed dial the Police Cantonale.

Few more kilometres farther you'll shed, on the spot, this hefty amount of simoleons.
You have the money, you keep your ride.
You'll call someone with a truck big or small to pick her up.

I'll suggest RGN.

You can sit on the CB1000R, gloves, boots, helmet, leathers, and all
for the truck ride to the border.
'cause you yourself won't drive here nothing with an engine for a long long while.
 

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To hell with the EU :p
You're right Autobahn is EU and is fast.
Not US fast, real fast.

Izit hell? Hell on wheels? No place for the CB1000R.

Or maybe couldn't place where those two guys from 44 teeth telling the story for the video are from?

They are Brits and motorcycle racers, with a track record.
Great Britain might be hell, but isn't EU.

The British accent might not allow you to figure out when they tell where they ride.
Last time I looked wasn't EU.
Either.

Gr眉脽 Gott from Hotel Krone in Giswil my good man.
 

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Yes, I heard of this but have always wondered about the wear+tear on the gears with using clutch vs clutch-less (manual or QS).
Motorcycle gearboxes are designed to work this way: it's why your quickshifter works the way it does.

but you can't just ruthlessly jam into the next gear without initiating proper mechanical sympathy.

You are probably aware that you can go up a gear by

  • using a positive throttle (light or heavy on the throttle)
  • putting pressure on the gear lever, ready to move up a gear (3 to 4 for instance)
  • momentarily dropping the throttle then immediately reapplying it.

Your quickshifter exactly mimics the same throttle action.

For downshifts, the actions are different:

  • this time you want to replicate blipping the throttle on a downshift. But you have to time it it perfectly otherwise you get a horrible gear shift and probably some of the wear that you worry about.
  • first thing to do is drop the throttle
  • then use your foot to go down a gear.
  • a tiny fraction of a second later, blip the throttle as you would if you'd used your clutch.
  • since you are almost always decelerating when changing down, drop the throttle again.
  • like with the upshift, your QS exactly mimics these steps.
  • if you have changed down because you are looking for extra power/acceleration then I'd recommend using your clutch. It is a lot harder to judge how to time throttle inputs without grinding gears if you are not decelerating. The CB1000R 2018 model's QS doesn't perform such a change very well at all. As I understand it, a more advance QS will handle dropping a gear for acceleration much better than the 2018 CB. Maybe the 2021 handles it better, since you can select different shift speeds.

Anyway, like I said, a modern motorcycle gearbox is designed to be shifted like this. I've been doing clutch-less upshifts for around 30 years on every bike I've owned or ridden. Only the Harleys I rode didn't like this.

I wasn't able to successfully do clutch-less downshifts until I finally bought a bike made this century 馃槂. Both my 2014 CB1000R and my 2012 CBR1000RR will easily downshift without clutch, though the CBR is much better, which I guess is because of lighter, sportier engine and gearbox components. In contrast, my 1994 CB1000F only allows clutchless down shifts at low revs, below about 3000. Above that, even a good firm stamp won't change down a gear without the clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 ·
Just installed SW-Motech sliders. What a pleasure to work with not having the pains of pulling and shoving fairings.
Automotive lighting Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Camera lens
 
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