Honda CB1000R Forum banner
41 - 60 of 110 Posts

Registered
Joined
155 Posts
...Typical freeway in Houston
Now I know what I'm missing.
Relaxed traffic, prize architecture, home sweet home on the range ... all that.

I should try that. Now who the h-e-l-l parked my bike there? :LOL:
Thief?

But the dealer vouched
-"No one, 'xcept mebbe some deeply deranged mind, would steal a Honda."

Sure
mountain road white parking lines, wannabee SUV, perfect grade asphalt.
'tis dreamland, bike paradise, right at the garage door.
Bliss!

Tire Wheel Vehicle Motorcycle Automotive lighting
 

Registered
2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
Joined
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #45 · (Edited)
I will try to bump up the rear shock Rebounding Damping and see what happens. By the way, the bounciness obviously gets worse as the speed is higher; i.e. above 55 MPH. I did raise my butt whenever I see a bump approaching on a highway.

And, yes, for those who are not Americans, our Interstate highways (called freeways) is quite an animal. In Texas, they are usually class-1 roads, which means they are not asphalt but concrete, which are more expensive, last longer and better quality. I know because when I was living in Houston, my friend was working in the Texas Highway Dept.

Usually, the posted max speeds ranges from 55 MPH all the way to 80 MPH in more remote areas. I may be wrong with the upper limit, there may be states that allow 85 MPH, which I am not aware of. Although, they are not German autobahn, when you have wide open roads, people speed a lot. Most traffic flow around 20 MPH above the speed limit in large cities like Houston. When I commuted from NJ to NYC on interstate I-78, you would be endangering yourself if you cannot keep at 80-85 MPH with the morning traffic, even though the posted speed limit is 65 MPH. I would have to respect the NJ/NYC/Connecticut drivers; they certainly have better skills in their high speed driving.

So, there you have it, the American interstate freeways are like a semi-autonomous "autobahn", where there is a legal speed limit but in actuality, it is determined by the flow of the traffic. The cops close one eye until they need to bag some people to fulfill their monthly speeding-ticket quota.
 

Registered
2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
Joined
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #46 ·
On closer inspection, looks like the rear shock Pre-Load was set to position #1 by the factory when the Owner's manual says #3.
In this case, I've now lost all confidence that the bike was set to factory specs in terms of the other settings. May be these were set by the dealer? Not sure.
I'm going to re-validate everything now.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bevo

Registered
Joined
2,265 Posts
I will try to bump up the rear shock Rebounding Damping and see what happens. By the way, the bounciness obviously gets worse as the speed is higher; i.e. above 55 MPH. I did raise my butt whenever I see a bump approaching on a highway.

And, yes, for those who are not Americans, our Interstate highways (called freeways) is quite an animal. In Texas, they are usually class-1 roads, which means they are not asphalt but concrete, which are more expensive, last longer and better quality. I know because when I was living in Houston, my friend was working in the Texas Highway Dept.

Usually, the posted max speeds ranges from 55 MPH all the way to 80 MPH in more remote areas. I may be wrong with the upper limit, there may be states that allow 85 MPH, which I am not aware of. Although, they are not German autobahn, when you have wide open roads, people speed a lot. Most traffic flow around 20 MPH above the speed limit in large cities like Houston. When I commuted from NJ to NYC on interstate I-78, you would be endangering yourself if you cannot keep at 80-85 MPH with the morning traffic, even though the posted speed limit is 65 MPH. I would have to respect the NJ/NYC/Connecticut drivers; they certainly have better skills in their high speed driving.

So, there you have it, the American interstate freeways are like a semi-autonomous "autobahn", where there is a legal speed limit but in actuality, it is determined by the flow of the traffic. The cops close one eye until they need to bag some people to fulfill their monthly speeding-ticket quota.
New Mexico has some 85 limits. I think several other states too. And I think maybe Montana has no daytime speed limit on some roads.

Concrete roads are horrible in so many ways.
 

Registered
Joined
2,265 Posts
Why so? Curious minds are asking ...
Probably more opinion than fact, but here goes...

The surfacing that concrete needs to provide grip is noisy and unpleasant to ride on a bike.

That grip is OK to a point, but once traction is lost, it's very slippery, compared to asphalt.

Those expansion gaps between concrete slabs produce a noisy and irritating rhythm, which is downright uncomfortable if your suspension is tuned for speed not comfort. And it's 20 times worse in my RV which has prehistoric "suspension".

When concrete roads break down, they can throw up huge lumps of concrete which are dangerous to anyone, especially bikers. Asphalt can have similar potholes, but doesn't usually have big chunks flying around as a result.

I don't trust concrete at all in the rain.

I don't trust concrete with any kind of fluid on it. That's not to say that I trust oily asphalt 馃槂 but I trust oily concrete less.
 

Registered
Joined
51 Posts
On closer inspection, looks like the rear shock Pre-Load was set to position #1 by the factory when the Owner's manual says #3.
In this case, I've now lost all confidence that the bike was set to factory specs in terms of the other settings. May be these were set by the dealer? Not sure.
I'm going to re-validate everything now.
Yeh.

So now you have a plan :)

Set everything to 'level 3' and evaluate your ride again, then tweak from there.

IMHO preload is 75% of the battle - it's easy to get that right for your weight, but don;t mess with anything else before you do this.

If it has all been set fully soft by your dealer (for whatever reason), your ride will be transformed!

Matt
 

Registered
2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
Joined
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #54 ·
With the QS on the NSC the upshifts have to be deliberate and forceful. I had a few false neutrals between 5th and 6th BEFORE I had the Honda QS installed.
I was using clutch to do regular shifting.
 

Registered
Joined
155 Posts
I was using clutch to do regular shifting.
Using the clutch: smart move.

The gearbox might need some running in.
Also foot position on the rear set vs linkage.might be optimized.

Some of us wear clown shoes on the bike, not standard issue.

One size-fits-all could be wishful thinking.

Even with the preload ring pos...ition
 

Registered
2019 CB1000R
Joined
916 Posts
I jack stuff up
Hmmmm, never had a mechanical failure on a bike. Crashed a couple, but never a failure.
Bikes I've owned from the 21st Century only because I'm not revealing my age :LOL: :
2009 CBR600RR ABS
2009 CBR1000RR ABS
2010 CBR1000RR
2012 CBR1000RR
2005 XL1200C
2015 CB500F
2014 CB1000R
2017 CBR1000S1 (current)
2019 CB1000R (current)
 

Registered
2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
Joined
205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #59 · (Edited)
Why? Did you turn the QS off? Even on bikes that didn't have a QS I wouldn't use the clutch shifting from 2nd gear on up.
So, are you saying you just jam the gear in without touching the clutch when you are above 2nd gear?
Anyway, I'll make sure that my left foot movement is absolutely deliberate from now on.

[...]
The gearbox might need some running in.
[...]
This is a good point. I saw my Ninja 1000sx exhibit this early (below 2,000 miles on the odometer) while the gears and the shifter are still breaking in.
Perhaps, by the time my NSC hits 4,000 miles, this will go away.
 

Registered
Joined
155 Posts
Hmmmm, never had a mechanical failure on a bike...
Drat
So many years in this century yet
and so few bikes!

Impressed I am.

The last bike that seized on me was a 12 XTZ Yam just out of the factory.

Last rather dangerous failure: a Trompf 1050 Speed triple
Front brake rotors disintegrated on mountain road.

Some minor valves bending, some breaking

A few pistons ...
Artifact Wood Automotive tire Gas Circle


A few exhaust pipes.
Very big noise when broken at the bend.

Two gearboxes -while riding, funny feeling-

Also a shaft drive coupling
-the shaft drive coupling broke and melted!

But never even a pip on a Honda.
 
41 - 60 of 110 Posts
Top