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2019 CB1000R
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Yup, an Öhlins or Race Tech would be better if they're offered for this bike. I haven't bothered to look because I'm not racing for a living.

The Öhlins forks on the SC77 are supposed to be serviced every 3 years, not the shock.
 

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2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)

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2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
How to install the Ohlins rear shock ... just in case ...
 

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A little dated
3 months ago rode the CB1000R from the dealer

Map Terrestrial plant Grass Screenshot Landscape


... underwhelming!
Blog: Honda CB1000R (2018) suspension settings said:
...The B1190 from Horncastle to Bardney
Be it Horncastle to Bardney, Barstow to Vegas or back,
riding a CB1000R rocking horse, shocks dialed default,
on a twisty rutted potholed road where the longest straight is about 200 yards
tests basic survival skills.

Front end bottoming out, twitching, back following her own and different drummer,
the bike jerked haphazardly a demented black mygale on adderall.

For ages, a ballerina size 18 stones, without ATGATT,
I don't need written consent anymore to dial shocks.
...but the basics are explained if we want to configure the numbers for the suspension.
Reached home.
Took 7 mighty clonks on rear preload ring, full hard on the lonely screw at the bottom,
10 turns with a repurposed wood chisel on the right fork leg and some significant tightening
of the tiny little screws on the left fork cap.

Then the CB1000R sawhorse rode, more or less,
like a motorcycle.

Natürlich comfort wasn't part of this compromise.
 

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2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Case you missed it:
[...]
Thanks so much.
Wonder where he got this table from. I think I have seen this table circulating in the Internet but I can never find it in Owner's Manual nor in Service Manual.
 

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2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Added an UPDATE to the original post.
 

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2021 CB1000R; 2018 CBR1000RR SP
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205 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Case you missed it:


Based on my weight + a little tail-bag, it is the 154 lbs line. All the settings on that line is exactly the factory settings.
Should I increase their stiffness more ?
I'm currently experiencing bounciness and when I go over bumps, like bridges, sometimes I felt like I was about to be thrown off the bike. So, I tend to slow down a lot when I come to visible bumps.
 

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'Bounce out of the saddle' or 'kicked up the ass' feeling from the rear can be tweaked by the rear shock rebound damping - go a quarter turn harder & try your route again. If improved but not quite right, go another quarter turn.

Obviously only make this change if you have already set the preload correctly for your weight. Use the chart as above (just as a guide - not a rulebook), and you will not be too far away from the right settings.

Don;t be too religious with charts like these though, we all ride differently, want a different 'feeling' from the bike, and travel different roads.

That's the fun of dialling in suspension :)
 

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2019 CB1000R
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Should I increase their stiffness more ?
Unlike your SC77, besides preload, the NSC shock can only be adjusted for rebound damping and not compression damping. For your weight, preload should be fine so the only option is adjusting the rebound.

Pro tip: On my commute there's an uneven expansion joint in the freeway that's quite a large bump. I lift my ass off the seat motocross style at 75mph just before I hit it.
 

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.... Use the chart as above (just as a guide - not a rulebook), and you will not be too far away from the right settings.
The chart is fine to know the basic settings.
Rather than wander into some crazy settings and ruin the experience.

Before the active suspensions, long time ago,
riding the archeological Honda CB1000R.
Calls for Grand-Ma tools of the trade:

Screw drivers, some big flat blade thingus, hook spanner,
zip tie for visual travel of front shocks.
Long narrow grease pencil, 'cause zip tie on the rear shock not practical.
Add patience, know-how and know-why.

An HB pencil AND a piece of paper to record the settings.
Case you want to go back to what seemed OK before.

Last items can be replaced with phone, tablet, whatever
running some kind of memo app.

The idea is to go one click at a time or quarter turn as said...

All that can be replaced by someone who's experienced in the trade
and you trust.
Recommended.

...That's the fun of dialling in suspension :)
Then you hit the Xth century cobblestones in old Le Mans.
Fun; hang for dear life.
Stretches of preserved roman way where huge flat stones are set far apart, angled crazy.
Also help enjoy the fun in your settings.

Pro tip...
First tip: don't try 75 mph around here sitting or standing.
Some roads aren't race track grade, with walls left and right, cages with driver on phone,
lithuanian HGV drivers watching porno while napping at the wheel,
cranky timekeepers in uniform lurking in the bushes crouching on dog poo.
License will be gone for good before 3d strike.

Second tip:
Some places 75 mph sounds optimistic in any position on the bike.
Proper shocks settings only to stay in your lane.

Here: Collada de Toses, Castellar de n'Hug, La Pobla de Lillet,
GPS track on much faster bikes with more better shocks or the CB1000R
never hit 75 mph.

Ecoregion Map Screenshot Terrestrial plant Font


The truth is elsewhere.

And No,
Mulholland drive, the Tail of the Dragon, aren't in the same league of commute.
 

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Some places 75 mph sounds optimistic
If you don't do 75 mph on open freeways in Houston you're likely to get run over. I've only been doing this for decades. 😉

On my SC77 SP when we're out in the country on group rides, some of the turns on our familiar routes have dips in them. I'll lift my ass off the seat while leaned over so that I'm not tossed around. Also, the bike's a bit more stable when my weight is only on the pegs.

Horse Helmet Horse tack Flat racing Equestrian sport

Like this except the bike is leaned over. ⬆ (y)
 

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If you don't do 75 mph on open freeways in Houston.... 😉
Elsewhere 75 mph will get you warned from the left lane first and from far
headlight flash,
then the driver behind
will brake with all it has to try not to kill the slow poke.

We brake for turtles.

1. The left lane is only for fast drivers that take over others
Don’t ever do 75 mph in the left lane if you have space on the right.

Been doing that for more than a few decades..
Don't try the left lane on a CB1000R
this bike is much to slow for Autobahn.

OTOH I fail to see what fun Autobahn riding on a slow two wheels would be.
 

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Elsewhere 75 mph will get you warned from the left lane first and from far
headlight flash,
then the driver behind
will brake with all it has to try not to kill the slow poke.

We brake for turtles.

1. The left lane is only for fast drivers that take over others
Don’t ever do 75 mph in the left lane if you have space on the right.

Been doing that for more than a few decades..
Don't try the left lane on a CB1000R
this bike is much to slow for Autobahn.

OTOH I fail to see what fun Autobahn riding on a slow two wheels would be.
Couple things:
Automotive parking light Car Sky Wheel Vehicle


Sky Car Land vehicle Cloud Wheel

Typical freeway in Houston
 
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