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I will try to bump up the rear shock Rebounding Damping and see what happens. By the way, the bounciness obviously gets worse as the speed is higher; i.e. above 55 MPH. I did raise my butt whenever I see a bump approaching on a highway.

And, yes, for those who are not Americans, our Interstate highways (called freeways) is quite an animal. In Texas, they are usually class-1 roads, which means they are not asphalt but concrete, which are more expensive, last longer and better quality. I know because when I was living in Houston, my friend was working in the Texas Highway Dept.

Usually, the posted max speeds ranges from 55 MPH all the way to 80 MPH in more remote areas. I may be wrong with the upper limit, there may be states that allow 85 MPH, which I am not aware of. Although, they are not German autobahn, when you have wide open roads, people speed a lot. Most traffic flow around 20 MPH above the speed limit in large cities like Houston. When I commuted from NJ to NYC on interstate I-78, you would be endangering yourself if you cannot keep at 80-85 MPH with the morning traffic, even though the posted speed limit is 65 MPH. I would have to respect the NJ/NYC/Connecticut drivers; they certainly have better skills in their high speed driving.

So, there you have it, the American interstate freeways are like a semi-autonomous "autobahn", where there is a legal speed limit but in actuality, it is determined by the flow of the traffic. The cops close one eye until they need to bag some people to fulfill their monthly speeding-ticket quota.
New Mexico has some 85 limits. I think several other states too. And I think maybe Montana has no daytime speed limit on some roads.

Concrete roads are horrible in so many ways.
 

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Why so? Curious minds are asking ...
Probably more opinion than fact, but here goes...

The surfacing that concrete needs to provide grip is noisy and unpleasant to ride on a bike.

That grip is OK to a point, but once traction is lost, it's very slippery, compared to asphalt.

Those expansion gaps between concrete slabs produce a noisy and irritating rhythm, which is downright uncomfortable if your suspension is tuned for speed not comfort. And it's 20 times worse in my RV which has prehistoric "suspension".

When concrete roads break down, they can throw up huge lumps of concrete which are dangerous to anyone, especially bikers. Asphalt can have similar potholes, but doesn't usually have big chunks flying around as a result.

I don't trust concrete at all in the rain.

I don't trust concrete with any kind of fluid on it. That's not to say that I trust oily asphalt 😃 but I trust oily concrete less.
 

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Informative video!

One side point he made in the vid (besides the main point) was the ability to ride home when you broke the clutch lever completely or your clutch cable snapped, using clutch-less shifts.
Hmmm ... how do you do that if you cannot get past the 1st gear without friction zone?
If you can start the bike in gear (not the

case for modern bikes) then just stop and stall in 1st or 2nd and press the starter or push start to go.

Otherwise, snag neutral before or after stopping and push start. Use 3rd.

Clutches gear shifting is easy up and down on modern bikes (with practice). The CB changes clutchlessly very smoothly with the right touch.
 

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Ah well there you go. I knew I'd driven on an 85 stretch driving from Gulfport, Mississippi to San Jose, California on i10 ... but it must have been part of Texas, not New Mexico.

On that 85 stretch, the standard pace appeared to be 100. Here in the San Francisco bay area, 65 is the normal limit, but much of the time even 75 is 'slow' compared to the majority. And many bikers will lane-split at 80++. So I've heard cough.
 

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Yes, I heard of this but have always wondered about the wear+tear on the gears with using clutch vs clutch-less (manual or QS).
Motorcycle gearboxes are designed to work this way: it's why your quickshifter works the way it does.

but you can't just ruthlessly jam into the next gear without initiating proper mechanical sympathy.

You are probably aware that you can go up a gear by

  • using a positive throttle (light or heavy on the throttle)
  • putting pressure on the gear lever, ready to move up a gear (3 to 4 for instance)
  • momentarily dropping the throttle then immediately reapplying it.

Your quickshifter exactly mimics the same throttle action.

For downshifts, the actions are different:

  • this time you want to replicate blipping the throttle on a downshift. But you have to time it it perfectly otherwise you get a horrible gear shift and probably some of the wear that you worry about.
  • first thing to do is drop the throttle
  • then use your foot to go down a gear.
  • a tiny fraction of a second later, blip the throttle as you would if you'd used your clutch.
  • since you are almost always decelerating when changing down, drop the throttle again.
  • like with the upshift, your QS exactly mimics these steps.
  • if you have changed down because you are looking for extra power/acceleration then I'd recommend using your clutch. It is a lot harder to judge how to time throttle inputs without grinding gears if you are not decelerating. The CB1000R 2018 model's QS doesn't perform such a change very well at all. As I understand it, a more advance QS will handle dropping a gear for acceleration much better than the 2018 CB. Maybe the 2021 handles it better, since you can select different shift speeds.

Anyway, like I said, a modern motorcycle gearbox is designed to be shifted like this. I've been doing clutch-less upshifts for around 30 years on every bike I've owned or ridden. Only the Harleys I rode didn't like this.

I wasn't able to successfully do clutch-less downshifts until I finally bought a bike made this century 😃. Both my 2014 CB1000R and my 2012 CBR1000RR will easily downshift without clutch, though the CBR is much better, which I guess is because of lighter, sportier engine and gearbox components. In contrast, my 1994 CB1000F only allows clutchless down shifts at low revs, below about 3000. Above that, even a good firm stamp won't change down a gear without the clutch.
 
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