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Discussion Starter #1
I was riding home from work tonight in the cold and wet and had me a thought. This particular thought came after I was sliding the rear end sidewards on the cold, wet corners. I've never had a problem dealing with these slides, and actually enjoy it (though I admit I'm not doing it on purpose) and it occurs to me that I'm probably going to be doing them more often on a more powerful bike?

So, I guess I have a question for those of you who have gone before us and moved from something like a Hornet up to something like a CB1000R, and the question is this: Am I more likely to find myself spinning the rear more often, or is the feel and reaction that I have from the Hornet going to be enough to deal with the CB in the same way?

I know when I mentioned getting my first big-bike (my original Hornet) I was concerned because I rode my 125 with the throttle pinned to the stop, even pulling away, so I was worried that I'd throw myself off. Everyone told me the same thing, and that was that I was in control of the throttle and I would twist it as much as I needed. It always seemed like a bit of a simple answer, but at the same time I've always felt that I've got good enough control of my bike to deal with whatever it's doing. I've done rear-wheel slides round corners, and what I can only describe as straight-line accidental rolling burnouts (you know, when you're caning it away on cold wet tyres and the rear breaks traction and lights up) and always dealt with them fine, so I'm not worried, I'm just curious of what I should expect, if you know what I mean?
 

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Erm... good question but a difficult one to answer as all bikes are obviously different.

Two things spring to mind though.... the extra torque (lower rev's will generate more power) and fuel injection. I think your model of Hornet has carbs? you will probably notice a difference when riding a fuel injected bike.... It is only slight but is noticeable.

Basically fuel injection does have a kind of on/off feel to it, so with some bikes initially you apply the throttle and there's nothing then it goes. As I say this is very slight and some bikes are better than others. In my case my 900 Hornet's injection was noticeable over my previously carbed 600 Hornet, the VFR "snatch" was very noticeable and I can't tell on my 07 FZ1.

The torque you just need to be wary of on slippery/icy roads.... I lost the backend on my 900 Hornet a few times - but keep the power on and hope the bike corrects itself as it gains grip.
 

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I'm no expert, but the CB1000R probably has a higher kerb weight than the Hornet, especially when fuelled up. But the torque will be significant and theoretically should prompt the tyres to lose traction more readily.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's pretty much what I thought. I've ridden injected bikes, Honda's at that, and I actually find that at times my bike can be snatchy (when on and off the throttle or at low revs) and my experience of injected Honda's has actually been quite good, though I did find that the CBF600 didn't allow the throttle to be off completely and kept pulling along in low revs, almost like it had anti-stall or something? Quite disconcerting!

I'm pretty sure it will be just like people have said and I'll quickly adapt, but I've often wished I still had my 125 for bad weather riding and I can see me regretting riding the CB to work in the heavy rain pretty soon. I'll soon get used to it I know. Oh, as for snatchy FI, I think one of the reviews I read claimed it was very smooth on the CB, but can't remember which one it was
 

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I can see me regretting riding the CB to work in the heavy rain pretty soon
Yeah I am just like that with the FZ1....

I reckon that CBF600 had too high an idle speed or the clutch was not adjusted correctly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hmm, maybe I'm not describing it very well, I dunno. Basically, when I roll up to the lights, I don't pull the clutch in until the bike has almost stalled. I guess I prefer to feel some drive through the rear rather than be coasting with the brake on, I dunno. Anyway, I tried it on the CBF and it just kept pulling, it wouldn't slow down further. I've never felt anything like it on any bike I've ever ridden before, and while I've not been riding for that long (only a bit over 2 years now) I've still ridden a few different bikes. All I know is that combined with the CBF's ABS/CBS, poor performance and bus-like proportions, I didn't like the bike at all!
 

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though I did find that the CBF600 didn't allow the throttle to be off completely and kept pulling along in low revs
Found the 07 Hornet to be exactly the same, seems impossible to stall it. Also noticed that it seems more snatchy at low revs as the injection cuts in compared to my older Hornet with carbs. And what's up with that auto choke? Bloody thing stays on for ages, are all FI bikes like this?

As for the combined braking, :thumbdown first time I used a bike with this and hated it, dragging the rear brake a little to correct a bad corner is a nightmare and something I couldn't get used to.

One other thing about the 07 Hornet, the annoying 'buzzing' noise which I've now realised is coming from the headlight area, possibly where the plastic panel meets the headlight. The plastic is a bit loose on one side (the bike only has 1300 miles on it) so the build quality doesn't seem up to usual Honda standards, hope the CB doesn't suffer with this also as the headlight assembly is similar to the Hornet in that it has plastic sides.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You don't get a choke on FI bikes John. On some you get a 'Fast Idle' and on others it's automatic
 

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Yes mate, I know it's not a choke but didn't know how else to describe it, it just seems to pump loads more petrol in than needed for ages. I take it the bike needs to reach a certain temperature before it goes back to normal?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As far as I understand, yes. It has to run richer while cold to prevent it stalling, which basically means you get higher revs. Hence why they call it "Fast Idle", although how anything can be fast and idle at the same time I don't know!
 

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I shouldn't worry about the extra power from the CB1000R, any bike can bite you in the arse. Just be aware that sliding the rear wheel at speed can lead to you getting highsided which isn't nice, isn't big and isn't clever!

Just be aware that you have a shitload more power on tap and you'll be fine. I've had 3 Blades and Blackbird, all fuel injected and they've all been fine. The upright riding position of the new Honda makes it easier to control with stuff like this anyway.

And I agree with Dan there was definately something wrong with the CB600 you rode, tickover set too fast would be my guess. I'm sure most would agree, a bike that doesn't stop of it's own accord while in gear is a recipe for disaster and wouldn't pass muster with the H and S brigade.

Jerry
 
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