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Ordered a ConStand ,very similar to ABBA,less price and shipping from Germany,cheaper in my case.And no € to Pounds rate difference and commissions.
 

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I have an ABBA that I'm currently using.
Works well enough I suppose, but it's a pain in the arse to use after paddock stands..
 

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I don't, I just put the back end up on the stand to adjust the chain, although I was told at my local dealer the chain slack Honda specify is with a rider sat on the bike.
I know this is months later, but you should adjust the chain on the side stand. If you use a paddock stand on the rear wheel and adjust the chain, you're keeping the axle stationary(stand) and cranking the whole bike back and forth. Remember- your axle is your point of adjustment, so when you run a stand, that is now immovable. You're rolling the whole bike on the front wheel. This will put a lot more stress on the spanner tabs. It's also MUCH harder to turn the adjuster like this so I don't know what other forces are at play it wasn't designed to take.

Put it in neutral and put it on the side stand, that way all you're doing is allowing the rear wheel to turn a little.
 

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You need to able to spin the wheel to check for any tight spots in the chain. If the chain is used it is normal to get tight spots.---You find the tightest spot and adjust the chain there.---That way you know the chain will never become rigid between the sprockets overloading the shaft bearings and accelerating chain and sprocket wear.
 

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You need to able to spin the wheel to check for any tight spots in the chain. If the chain is used it is normal to get tight spots.---You find the tightest spot and adjust the chain there.---That way you know the chain will never become rigid between the sprockets overloading the shaft bearings and accelerating chain and sprocket wear.
This 100%......

I know this is months later, but you should adjust the chain on the side stand. If you use a paddock stand on the rear wheel and adjust the chain, you're keeping the axle stationary(stand) and cranking the whole bike back and forth. Remember- your axle is your point of adjustment, so when you run a stand, that is now immovable. You're rolling the whole bike on the front wheel. This will put a lot more stress on the spanner tabs. It's also MUCH harder to turn the adjuster like this so I don't know what other forces are at play it wasn't designed to take.

Put it in neutral and put it on the side stand, that way all you're doing is allowing the rear wheel to turn a little.
Whu...?????
Can you re-do that in English please?....It's mostly incomprehensible.
 

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This 100%......



Whu...?????
Can you re-do that in English please?....It's mostly incomprehensible.
Yes, it's simple. When you adjust the chain, you're moving the axle back and forth. When you use a rear paddock stand on our bike, you're lifting the bike by the axle through the center (the pin on your stand).

If you try to adjust your chain, you're not able to move the axle back and forth, since it is now pinned into the stand. This means the only thing that can move is either the whole paddock stand, or the bike itself.

On a standard swing arm unit, you hold the bike up with a paddock stand, you're not literally lifting the bike by the axle like you are with the CB1000R so chain adjustments can be made on one.
 

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Are there spanner tabs on the newest CBs ??

On my older model there's just one locking bolt.

Unless your chain was super loose when you started adjusting it there is virtually no movement of the bikes front wheel during adjustment.

If there was this kind of problem I'm sure that Honda would have high-lighted it in the bikes hand book.-------:book

This is the first time I've heard of this in my 10 years on this forum.------:notme
 

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If you try to adjust your chain, you're not able to move the axle back and forth, since it is now pinned into the stand. This means the only thing that can move is either the whole paddock stand, or the bike itself.
Agree you're lifting the bike by it's axle. But it's in no way a problem.
When you adjust chain, bike front wheel rolls forwards or backwards my a few mm...if that.
Can't see what difference it makes given all bikes roll forwards/backwards a few mm when you lift with any paddock stand.
 

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Agree you're lifting the bike by it's axle. But it's in no way a problem.
When you adjust chain, bike front wheel rolls forwards or backwards my a few mm...if that.
Can't see what difference it makes given all bikes roll forwards/backwards a few mm when you lift with any paddock stand.
When I adjust on the side stand in N, my rear wheel rolls back and forth with the axle. Only reason I do this is to lesson the effort required to adjust and to keep my spanner tabs from getting marred! Theoretically if you aren't damaging the tabs then it shouldn't be a worry, but in N on a side stand, you will have the least amount of force required unless you could easily raise the rear with a center stand.
 

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Are there spanner tabs on the newest CBs ??

On my older model there's just one locking bolt.

Unless your chain was super loose when you started adjusting it there is virtually no movement of the bikes front wheel during adjustment.

If there was this kind of problem I'm sure that Honda would have high-lighted it in the bikes hand book.-------:book

This is the first time I've heard of this in my 10 years on this forum.------:notme
And I won't disagree, I haven't really had major issues, but I did notice that the effort required to adjust the chain is substantially higher on a paddock stand or in gear than on a side stand in Neutral. Without the correct spanner tool as well, you will struggle a little more on a high mileage bike with less than perfect cleanliness mucking up the job!

I just focus on making the job require the least amount of stress and effort on tools/fasteners.
 

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MachRider.---Sometimes when a chain has been slightly stretched by a bit of hard acceleration the chain can develop loose and tight spots.---If that happens then you have to roll the bike backwards and forwards to find that tight spot before you adjust the chain. ( That's if you are using a side stand. )
 

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Below is a picture of what I use to adjust the rear chain on the side stand.




Roller skates are useful in many ways combined with a bit of wood and steel plate.---:rollin


Bike ramp 2.JPG
 

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MachRider.---Sometimes when a chain has been slightly stretched by a bit of hard acceleration the chain can develop loose and tight spots.---If that happens then you have to roll the bike backwards and forwards to find that tight spot before you adjust the chain. ( That's if you are using a side stand. )
Yup, I pull the bike over to spin the rear wheel and see where the tight spot is. Usually easy enough to see just rolling it back in the garage
 

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I forgot to mention. With the rear wheel on that roller skate I can turn the wheel easily by hand to oil the chain.
 

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That's a seriously good hack you have there trevloc.
When I first tried it I was Really amazed how easy it was to use. I was just tinkering about not expecting it to work after I made it.. But it DID.----------:yay
 

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I made this the evening i got the bike just to have something.
It works ok. But i will probably get a Constand center stand so i can remove the wheel and have full access from both sides.
As others have mentioned, the pin is only about 18 mm. and is easily bent.
You can get some (R&G) where the pin has a "stop" on the righ hand siden. But then you still can´t remove the wheel.


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