Honda CB1000R Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys

I just bought 2 of these plugs off flea bay and wish I hadn't bothered IMG_2667.jpg IMG_2669.JPG

Put it in a started to tighten with a torque wrench and well before it clicked it twisted off in the hole!:mad:

After a bit of spanner throwing and choice language i managed to get it out.

I bought them from a company called Bitzforbikes and phoned them right away, they offered me a replacement but was declined and then offered a full refund for the two:thumb

I ended up using there crush washer and the original plug.

Wont be using them again.

Anyone else had this issue?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
I did wonder about these but decided to stick with OEM ..... glad i did, nice warning by the way, lets hope no one buys these pieces of crap.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,048 Posts
Have heard horror stories about these before - I just buy the Oem sump bolts and washers - frequent oil changes will mean a magnetic bolt isn't really needed...glad you got away with it - really the supplier should be reported to trading standards as the items are not fit for purpose and likely to damage vehicles ....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,535 Posts
If there is enough metal in your oil for that to do anything, you have much bigger problems. Be glad you didn't damage the threads in the sump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
If there is enough metal in your oil for that to do anything, you have much bigger problems. Be glad you didn't damage the threads in the sump.
It was just out of curiosity to see if there was any foreign objects floating around in there. I did hear from one of my mates who once found a broken sprocket tooth using a magnetic plug but he races.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Magnetic sump plugs came in with the Mini in about 1962/3. I was an apprentice at the time with a BMC main dealer, the early minis were experiencing engine failures, sometimes within the run-in period. The cause was found to be swarf caused by gears wearing in, These were the first vehicles that the gearbox and engine oil were common. The solution was to fit a magnetic sump plug to gather swarf in that crucial run-in period and it worked. Modern engines are built from much more resilient materials and to much finer tolerances therefore there is almost no swarf generated in the run-in period. Indeed the run-in is almost redundant these days. When I worked as an engineer in heavy industry we regularly sampled and analysed oil for particle content, its called ferography. This was necessary because the conditions of use meant that foreign unwanted material often contaminated oil causing excesive wear. The level of particle contamination, particularly ferous particles provided an indication of wear. You would not expect to have oil contamination in a modern motorcycle engine and modern oils are so much improved in lubrication and resistance to thermo mechanical stress that it is unlikely you need magnetic plugs. The plug you have used appears to me to be a very badly engineered item. The magnet has too large a diameter which neccesitates a large diameter bore in the plug which in turn reduces the cross sectional area of the thread. This is the reason it sheared, there wasn't enough meat in the thread thickness. There is nothing wrong with fitting magnetic plugs and they will provide an early warning of excessive wear but you do need to buy a proprietry item or dril and fit a magnet into your plug. Magnets can be purchased very cheaply from Radio Spares etc. Just fit a small diameter magnet leaving plenty of meat in the thread.
 

·
Registered
09/09/09----CB 1,000R
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
A decent quality magnetic plug might just come in handy.

On those Very Rare occasions when you might crunch a gear---:p----tiny pieces of hard metal may end up floating around in the oil.

Better for them to end up, instead, stuck to a magnet than embedded in a big end shell. ( Or any other delicate part. Lol. )

PS. I have on several occasions, especially with garden tools, glued a strong magnet to the outside of the alloy casing. This will attract and hold any minute floating particles of hardened steel to the inside of the casing.
With no oil pressure to make them move they will stay where they stick. No need to put something INSIDE the engine like those faulty drain plugs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Magnetic sump plugs came in with the Mini in about 1962/3. I was an apprentice at the time with a BMC main dealer, the early minis were experiencing engine failures, sometimes within the run-in period. The cause was found to be swarf caused by gears wearing in, These were the first vehicles that the gearbox and engine oil were common. The solution was to fit a magnetic sump plug to gather swarf in that crucial run-in period and it worked. Modern engines are built from much more resilient materials and to much finer tolerances therefore there is almost no swarf generated in the run-in period. Indeed the run-in is almost redundant these days. When I worked as an engineer in heavy industry we regularly sampled and analysed oil for particle content, its called ferography. This was necessary because the conditions of use meant that foreign unwanted material often contaminated oil causing excesive wear. The level of particle contamination, particularly ferous particles provided an indication of wear. You would not expect to have oil contamination in a modern motorcycle engine and modern oils are so much improved in lubrication and resistance to thermo mechanical stress that it is unlikely you need magnetic plugs. The plug you have used appears to me to be a very badly engineered item. The magnet has too large a diameter which neccesitates a large diameter bore in the plug which in turn reduces the cross sectional area of the thread. This is the reason it sheared, there wasn't enough meat in the thread thickness. There is nothing wrong with fitting magnetic plugs and they will provide an early warning of excessive wear but you do need to buy a proprietry item or dril and fit a magnet into your plug. Magnets can be purchased very cheaply from Radio Spares etc. Just fit a small diameter magnet leaving plenty of meat in the thread.
Great post, thanks. You can see in the photos how thin the walls of the bolt are and isn't surprising that it snapped. I used a very strong small magnet I glued to the end of a drill bit to fish out the broken magnet and noticed that no other debris was sitting in the bottom of the sump. I will just use OEM plugs now and put faith into the modern engine and I always use the best oil I can buy.
 

·
Registered
09/09/09----CB 1,000R
Joined
·
4,002 Posts
Great post, thanks. You can see in the photos how thin the walls of the bolt are and isn't surprising that it snapped. I used a very strong small magnet I glued to the end of a drill bit to fish out the broken magnet and noticed that no other debris was sitting in the bottom of the sump. I will just use OEM plugs now and put faith into the modern engine and I always use the best oil I can buy.
These telescopic tools are very handy too. Cheap to buy.



Magnetic pick up tool..jpg
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top