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For eg; ....hmmm Speed upto 70+ or so on your 4th gear, then pretend you want to slow down without using your brakes, let go of the throttle, pull the clutch in, shift down quickly to 3rd and release the clutch fast, after you feel the engine trust, quickly pull the clutch back in & shift down to 2nd gear and release the clutch fast ....then you can use your brake OR continue and shift down to 1st and release the clutch fast...
practice it a few time :) so when your brake pads are worn out , you can always try to slow down this way ;)
 

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2019 CB1000R
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Hi everyone,

Can someone please explain to me how Engine Brake Control works? Curious since this is the first bike I've owned with that option
So engine braking happens when you close the throttle. It's more pronounced in motorcycles than automobiles due to the ratio of engine displacement and vehicle weight. Engine braking is variable on bikes with electronic throttles because the ECU can control the degree the throttle bodies (butterfly valves) close while the throttle is completely closed. Racers depend on engine braking in assisting with braking when entering a corner. Every rider has their own riding style so in MotoGP engine braking can be programmed for each specific corner on a specific track.

Example:
Marc Marquez had a huge lead at COTA as usual in 2019. His Honda had been having issues with inconsistent engine braking. He went into a turn expecting the programmed engine braking to assist which didn't happen. The lack of engine braking caused him to lock the front wheel and he lowsided.

On the NSC the difference between the engine braking settings is subtle.
 

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Honda CB1000R 2021
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So engine braking happens when you close the throttle. It's more pronounced in motorcycles than automobiles due to the ratio of engine displacement and vehicle weight. Engine braking is variable on bikes with electronic throttles because the ECU can control the degree the throttle bodies (butterfly valves) close while the throttle is completely closed. Racers depend on engine braking in assisting with braking when entering a corner. Every rider has their own riding style so in MotoGP engine braking can be programmed for each specific corner on a specific track.

Example:
Marc Marquez had a huge lead at COTA as usual in 2019. His Honda had been having issues with inconsistent engine braking. He went into a turn expecting the programmed engine braking to assist which didn't happen. The lack of engine braking caused him to lock the front wheel and he lowsided.

On the NSC the difference between the engine braking settings is subtle.
I see, that makes sense. I tried turning EB down to 1 yesterday and could feel a little less engine brake going on but it felt like the bike was ready to rev when I openned the throttle. Makes sense if the throttle butterflies are part closed.
 
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