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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I only got one key with my 2019 CB1000R, after buying a new blank from Honda I learned a few things that might help others if doing the same.

These keys have a chip in them, as such they can be damaged & fail - if you only have 1 key, that means a very expensive £1500+ spot of work to get fixed by replacing the ecu & new keys!

So I bought a new key blank from Honda, and then the fun started. The first few places I tried wouldn't cut the key - they wanted to provide a full service key replacement for £300 instead. I eventually found a local locksmith who cut it for £20.

It also needs coding to the bike - you can do this yourself quite easily with a wire harness bought from ebay for £25 (search Honda HISS key programmer) - this comes with 3x ports that attach to the CPS socket off the engine.

It will say that the part is not compatible with a 2018+ CB1000R, but ignore that. I just did it yesterday & the correct socket is indeed included.

The other issue is in following the instructions which are generic & have a couple of errors!

First off, to get to the port on the CB1000R you need to raise the fuel tank a few inches - easy enough. No need to take it all the way off, just loosen the bolts & lean it a bit to one side. The CPS/programming port is easily identified as being red (most others are black or grey).

Next connect up the wiring harness to the socket + the battery terminals, insert your good key & turn to position 1 on the ignition. Note that the HISS red light should stay solid on.

Then remove the positive battery lead from the harness & wait ten seconds (instructions say 2 - this doesn't work).

Reconnect the battery lead. The HISS light will stay solid red for 3 seconds, then flash 4 times. Switch off the bike & remove the key.

Insert your new blank key in the ignition, turn to position 1. The HISS light will stay solid for 3 seconds then flash 4 times.

That's it - remove the key, remove the wiring harness, fasten the tank back on & all done.

All told it was easy once I figure out the instructions provided were wrong :)

Total cost under £100 for a new key - could be cheaper if you trust the ebay keys, but I went the Honda route just to be sure. I've seen people hack up the wiring harness themselves also, which might save a few pounds - but for £25 ready made I figure it wasn't too bad.
 

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...Total cost under £100 for a new key - could be cheaper if you trust the ebay keys, but I went the Honda route just to be sure. I've seen people hack up the wiring harness themselves also, which might save a few pounds - but for £25 ready made I figure it wasn't too bad.
Thanks for helping halfwit motorcycle thieves.
At least those that know not how to circumvent HISS.

Proof also that HISS CB1000R needs sly sleight of hand for the owner
not to get stranded by a faulty key.

Tesla's smartphone key fob comes to mind.

What about parts of the world :unsure: that import non HISS secure CB1000R NSCs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That's not how HISS works - no help to thieves mate. Without a fully working key, this info is useless. If you steal the bike without a key, to get it up & running you need a full ecu swap out + new keys.... I don't think that's what happens when bikes are stolen.

They get chopped up & flogged for parts IMHO.

From what I read online, HISS (it's an immobiliser) is only standard in europe & africa, looks like in the US they do not have it on the bike at all!

So in the US you can force the lock with a well placed screwdriver & ride away.... mental.
 

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That's not how HISS works - no help to thieves mate. Without a fully working key, this info is useless. If you steal the bike without a key, to get it up & running you need a full ecu swap out + new keys.... I don't think that's what happens when bikes are stolen.

They get chopped up & flogged for parts IMHO.

From what I read online, HISS (it's an immobiliser) is only standard in europe & africa, looks like in the US they do not have it on the bike at all!

So in the US you can force the lock with a well placed screwdriver & ride away.... mental.
In the USA, Honda is more interested in making the bike cheap by stripping features. There's also no toolkit, so the thieves have to bring their own screwdriver.
 
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