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Yeah, I agree with Bevo, in that there are too many unknowns in your story.
  • How early in the ride was it?
  • What was the temperature and how late in the day (asphalt heats up as the day goes on).
  • Were you on the brakes?
  • How far over were you leaning?
  • Are you sure the road was clean?
  • Are there filled cracks in the road (those are slippery over maybe 75 or 80 deg)?
  • How much of your tires did you use?
I am not a professional rider, but I have been riding for quite a few years, and I do try to use all my tire (Getting edgy). I also realize the Bridgestones are a better tire than the Dunlops, however, I still think you could use quite a bit of the Dunlop when in good conditions. If I go out with newish people I tend to lead at a moderate pace, meaning I could probably go at least 50% faster around the corners, and they still tend to fall behind. New people on bikes tend to underestimate how far over they can lean. This may not be true for you. Perhaps you just got done watching some MotoGP and you were hitting a 55deg lean on your bike. But if you answer some of the questions above and send a picture of both your tires, we would have a better idea.
Good luck to you!
 

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My CB came with Bridgestones and they were fine. But when it came time to replace them I fitted Michelin Pilot Road 5s.

That's because I spend more time riding on wet roads in heavy traffic than carving bends on glorious sunny days. The Michelins are great tyres and make more sense than full-on sports tyres given how I use the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
If this is your first street bike then there's probably more to it than just the tires. Still, I'm an advanced rider and I don't trust these Dunlops.



The bike follows your eyes. Look at where you want to go, NOT where you don't want to go. If you look at the ditch on the outside of a turn, the bike is going to be like, "well, he's looking at the ditch so here we go."

1st:
I love how everybody says „yeah, youre a rookie ………… but STILL, I don't trust Dunlops" :D:D:D
It's so funny how people acknowledge my experience but have to admit that it's just a bad tire.

2nd:
That is SO WEIRD! They taught that up and down in drivers ed. LOOK TOWARDS THE GAP, NOT TOWARDS THE FENCE YOURE AVOIDING!
And I remember thinking "pfsh, who even does that?"
Yet, when I ride, I'm always like … pot hole … POT HOLE … ERMAHGERD POT HOLE!!!
I will try to keep that in mind more.

Funny how small things make such a big difference, aye?
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Yeah, I agree with Bevo, in that there are too many unknowns in your story
Sorry, I guess it wasn't a proper detailed description of my issue. Let me answer your questions real quick.

  • How early in the ride was it?
+++ bout an hour in.
  • What was the temperature and how late in the day (asphalt heats up as the day goes on).
+++ afternoon. pretty darn sunny, both times. I remember, however, the 2nd time I sliddedded, it was in the shadow.
  • Were you on the brakes?
+++ not even a bit.
  • How far over were you leaning?
+++ well, according to my driving instructor: “You never lean as much as you think you are“. So I'd say rather on the more upright side than dragging my arm over the tank.
  • Are you sure the road was clean?
+++ Nope. Was too busy getting my heart out of my mouth. I just slowed down, rolled out and didnt think to go back and check.
  • Are there filled cracks in the road (those are slippery over maybe 75 or 80 deg)?
+++ Usually, I don't go faster than I can see the road – AND brake in time. So I guess I was on the slower side and went into the turn looking for traffic. Say, 50kmh? And mid-lean, the front just went.
  • How much of your tires did you use?
+++ Bike has now 3500 km on it. So sub3 when it happened.


Youre deffo right that I could probably lean more than I trust the bike. And I WANT to.
But wouldn't you agree that this skill would be learned best on sticky tires?

Also, the bike was a test bike and came with 600km on it. And the tires are almost all the way to the edge (no chicken strips). So SOMEONE proved me wrong, during a test ride, showing that this leans over quite a bit! However … leaning fine 100 times doesn't mean you won't slip out the 101st time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
My CB came with Bridgestones and they were fine. But when it came time to replace them I fitted Michelin Pilot Road 5s.

That's because I spend more time riding on wet roads in heavy traffic than carving bends on glorious sunny days. The Michelins are great tyres and make more sense than full-on sports tyres given how I use the bike.
Andy? Is that you?

Frankly, I wanted to ask about the Road 5s! Heard much good about them, especially in the wet.
Now, after my incidents, I ride IN THE DRY like it's wet. So imagine how cautious I'd get when it's raining.
So even more than a really nice sticky tire (see below) I guess I'd feel even more safe with a great weather tire.
What do you guys think?

------

So far, these are tires I found or were recommended. If you have any experiences with those, PLEASE share.

Bridgestone Battlax s21 hypersports (sticky as hell, but only 6k use)
Avon spirit ST (hard to find)
Michelin Road 5 (great in the wet, hold treat forever, but expensive)
 

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Since the Michelins commonly last 2x or more miles than supersports tyres, I never consider them expensive.

The two most likely reasons for the front slipping when you are not at full lean are gravel and oil. Both can be hard to spot, especially in shadow. And 'gravel' can also just be dirt, so ranging from small pebbles down to sand or even almost dust.

If that's what made you slip, then you can do one thing in addition to shitting yourself and freezing. A good hard stamp of your inside foot on the road can recover a slide like that. The same has saved me on snow, ice and loose road surfaces several times.

Learning to see these hazards takes time. You already admitted you may be fixated by potholes. Per advice you've no doubt already been given or seen on YouTube, your forward observation will help you to see these hazards with practice.

But you should also learn where you might encounter fine gravel and plan to avoid it. The outside (right hand side) of left-hand curves will typically have gravel deposits, so the ideal line for forward observation (as far to the right as possible until you can see the exit of the curve) may also be the worst place to be on two wheels because when you add even a small amount of lean, the front can start to lose traction.

On tight right-handers avoid taking the inside 'racing' line but also be prepared to avoid the center of your lane, as both of these can be strewn with gravel that has been pulled onto the road by corner-cutting cars and trucks.

The Dunlops may well be 'bad' tyres, relative to others on the market. I have no experience of them so no opinion. But all of your descriptions so far make it likely that your inexperience, and your selection of a relatively heavy and powerful bike, are contributing to your slides.

Changing your tyres might help, even if just to get past a psychological barrier, but I think really you just need many more miles under your ass to have better all-round control of your bike and command of the road. If you were my friend or family I'd be suggesting you get a more beginner-friendly bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Since the Michelins commonly last 2x or more miles than supersports tyres, I never consider them expensive.

The two most likely reasons for the front slipping when you are not at full lean are gravel and oil. Both can be hard to spot, especially in shadow. And 'gravel' can also just be dirt, so ranging from small pebbles down to sand or even almost dust.

Changing your tyres might help, even if just to get past a psychological barrier, but I think really you just need many more miles under your ass to have better all-round control of your bike and command of the road. If you were my friend or family I'd be suggesting you get a more beginner-friendly bike.
Where I ride, the roads are just as flat and as straight as a runway, and then IMMEDIATELY turn into a 40kmh turn, full of tractor droppings, potholes and bad lighting (sunlight thru tree branches).
I mean, if anything, these conditions help me to become a better rider through the fact alone that they throw everything at me they have!
But at this point, I have to agree with all'a yus, the psychological factor probably will be my downfall, rather than the tires itself. And like you said, maybe it was just gravel!
(The other time, however, was in city traffic. No oil, no gravel, just clean, dry street! It was DEFFO the tire)

Youre spot on with the beginner-friendly bike. But being a fairly large guy AND having a major shortage of bikes that come to EU at the moment (china ain't delivering jack) I didnt have many options.
Ducatis sound like lawn mowers, harley was pretty up there ($$$), my DREAM BIKE (Indian Scout Bobber) wasn't available all year … and, frankly, tons of nude bikes are just to small for me.
And I rather drop dead than be seen on a KTM Super Duke.

You know what? I just remembered why I picked the bike!!
During testing, I went over the Autobahn and tested how fast I dare to ride … when Navi said "please take exit".
So being just a hair under light speed, I went down the bendy down-ramp leaning like Michael Jackson in Smooth Criminal.
I remember shooting out of that exit, thinking "DAMN, if this bike can do THAT, I feel pretty safe doing stuff like this."

Isn't THAT ironic?
 

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If this is your first street bike then there's probably more to it than just the tires. Still, I'm an advanced rider and I don't trust these Dunlops.

View attachment 49293

The bike follows your eyes. Look at where you want to go, NOT where you don't want to go. If you look at the ditch on the outside of a turn, the bike is going to be like, "well, he's looking at the ditch so here we go."
49294
 

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Andy? Is that you?
Nope, afraid not. :)

Thanks to Covid lockdowns and working from home I don't have much day-in-day-out experience of the Pilot Road 5s yet.

But I've had other generations of PRs on my previous bikes, and they're both brilliant in the wet and very decent in the dry (acknowledging they're not sports tyres).

If I regularly rode hard in the twisties I'd look at putting a Pilot Power on the front for maximum grip on corner entry. But as I'm old, slow and averse to pain that's not one of my requirements...
 

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Nope, afraid not. :)

Thanks to Covid lockdowns and working from home I don't have much day-in-day-out experience of the Pilot Road 5s yet.

But I've had other generations of PRs on my previous bikes, and they're both brilliant in the wet and very decent in the dry (acknowledging they're not sports tyres).

If I regularly rode hard in the twisties I'd look at putting a Pilot Power on the front for maximum grip on corner entry. But as I'm old, slow and averse to pain that's not one of my requirements...
My experience with Road 5s, including several track days with those and with Pilot Road 4s, on both CB1000R and CBR1000RR, is that it takes a better man than me to outride the Road 5s on the street. I ride fast group on the track (not the fastest on track!) and can hold my own with Road 5s, but prefer Power Cup Evos ... except that I kill a set of those in a single track day, vs getting a track day or two out of Road 5s plus several thousand street miles.
 

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similar thing happened to me, had my CB1K for 4yrs on Michelins (Pilot 3 &4s) and could corner like mad (not like Bevo :p ) then the tyre shop recommended I get a different make - Bridgestones and I hated them, I had no feeling.

I spend months trying to get used to them, but never did! Went back to Pilot 5s and never looked back!

tl/dr: feeling from a tyre is a personal thing, try a different make
 

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^^^ I used to be totally a Pirelli man, but Road 4s, and then 5s, caused me to undertake a conversion operation...

PS I still like Pilot Powers better than Roads, except in crappy wet conditions... and I never did get on with Bridgestones... or Dunlops...
 

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as to your issues Donnie, I honestly think it's just inexperience showing. it takes a long while to get to know what you and the bike are capable of. before that, you have a totally logical lack of trust. that's good - it helps keep you alive! one 'exercise' I might suggest to increase your confidence is to make a game out of tightening your curves. partway thru ANY curve, simply push on your bars a bit harder. you'll turn sharper! or, if you're 'leaned off' with your body, drop your upper body - again, you'll turn sharper. the point is to train your mind that there is 'more' available. there almost always is, except maybe now and again on a track day! have fun, and don't worry about yourself. everybody needs time, and the longer you spend in the saddle, to more intuitive it all becomes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
as to your issues Donnie, I honestly think it's just inexperience showing. it takes a long while to get to know what you and the bike are capable of. before that, you have a totally logical lack of trust. that's good - it helps keep you alive! one 'exercise' I might suggest to increase your confidence is to make a game out of tightening your curves. partway thru ANY curve, simply push on your bars a bit harder. you'll turn sharper! or, if you're 'leaned off' with your body, drop your upper body - again, you'll turn sharper. the point is to train your mind that there is 'more' available. there almost always is, except maybe now and again on a track day! have fun, and don't worry about yourself. everybody needs time, and the longer you spend in the saddle, to more intuitive it all becomes.

I’ve been trying to tighten my curves all winter! Nothing but salad, veggies and red fruit :p

All kidding aside, thank you again for brilliant advice! I will try and increm….. incri …. Mennnn … Increay .… I will try bit by bit to go tighter corners.

ALSO, I think the point made before about it now also being a psychological thing, I have an appointment tomorrow to get ROAD 5 fitted. 420 EUROS! Those BASTARDS!
Let’s hope they hold what Michelin promises.

I will report shortly!
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
All right … I got the ROAD 5 installed.
After that, I thought I quickly pop by the car wash and clean my bike.
Was packed! So I just rode on … and on … and on …

All in all, I was on the bike for 6 hours!! That's how much I liked these new tires!
Man, the CB1KR completely transformed!! I had no idea tires make this much of a difference.

Thank you all again for your wisdom.
Problem solved!
 

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All right … I got the ROAD 5 installed.
After that, I thought I quickly pop by the car wash and clean my bike.
Was packed! So I just rode on … and on … and on …

All in all, I was on the bike for 6 hours!! That's how much I liked these new tires!
Man, the CB1KR completely transformed!! I had no idea tires make this much of a difference.

Thank you all again for your wisdom.
Problem solved!
Yaaay another convert 😃
 
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